Pre Christmas project works

This week we shall carry out some drainage work on the Valley to tackle some areas which can become wet in winter. There was a clay pipe drainage but, inevitably this was disturbed during the installation of our irrigation system in 2009 when irrigation pipes were installed using a mole plough. The majority of the work will be complete by the weekend. Holes to be drained include 4th, 5th, 10th & 11th.

There are some small additions to spectator areas, and also a few additional services to be installed over the next number of weeks, as well as the tunnel ends to be removed before flooring is laid.

None of this work around Dunluce will affect how the course plays.

New pathway must be laid to allow access from the hockey pitch to the links which is necessary for tv buggies next year.

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Autumn Update

After a remarkably dry summer with less than 3 inches of rain in over 5 months, Dunluce has recovered with very little damage to turf. Localised areas on fairways around bunkers have required over-seeding and some bunker edges require re-turfing work in the winter.

Colour returned to the turf and rates of growth increased considerably within a few days of natural rainfall and for players the course naturally slowed down.

We were mowing greens and removing 3 times the volume of grass within a week of the rainfall returning.

Lee, happy at his work enjoying the physical aspect of bunker maintenance

The red arrows returned again at the start of September for Portrush Airwaves air show. Strange to see the red arrows and the hurricane from your golf course.

We have finally added the new Senior bronzes to the Dunluce Links with holes 7 & 9 being left off as we plan to add forward tees this winter to shorten the carry.

Some quick germination of seed on the Valley 15th green with tufts of new grass appearing after only 10 days.

This picture shows drought damage, and the subsequent overseeding which was carried out on a mound on the Valley 4th hole.

This picture is the 1st tee complex on Dunluce where you can see some drought damage still remains but with a little seed this area will be turned around in the next 2 weeks.

Course setup this morning

After such a busy season some pathways have begun to show signs of wear and this picture shows the benefits of overseeding. Paths have all been fertilised now and will be protected using rope and posts from October.

September is a great time of year for some stunning sunrises and sunsets but the mobile phone just doesn’t do it justice..

As the season is coming to as end our focus must be to protect the links as best we can, rope and posts will be used throughout the links to guide golfers and also greens staff and prevent wear in key areas. This may also be done to encourage thickening or weak rough areas.

The tunnel will be opened and we will add the housing and ducting for the bunker cameras from early November

The R&A will start the infrastructure build from the 1st April, so not long…I must say its getting quite exciting now!

147th Open at Carnoustie

What a brilliant week at Carnoustie Golf Links for this years Open Championship.

After unprecedented drought conditions, the Links was a dry as any of the greens staff could remember and although this meant that there was very little mowing to be done, this creates its own challenges in achieving consistent playing surfaces. This was done brilliantly by the team at Carnoustie.

Once play finishes today, the countdown begins for the 148th Open at Royal Portrush.

Aaron Bell volunteered to assist the greens staff for the week in mowing tees and surrounds amongst other tasks. This is the 3rd Open Championship in which we have sent our own greenkeepers to assist, which has been great experience for our own staff.

This years Open venues volunteers

I attended the build up from Sunday through Wednesday for both morning and evening set up which was great to see. Sandy Reid, Craig Boath and their team were very accommodating and generous in their time which was really beneficial to us for next years Championship.

North of Ireland Championship

Another fine week of weather for the North of Ireland Championship the competitors were lucky enough to play in benign conditions.

The course is as firm as most can remember yet we have been able to use just enough water to keep the turf alive.

2 weeks ago we began lightly watering landing areas morning and evening to aid germination of divots as this is the down side to these drought conditions.

Greens were rolling at 10′ 2″ at the beginning of the week increasing to 10′ 6″ by the final day on Friday.

Paul, waiting for the hole paint to dry a little before the next coat.

Valley 4th on Qualifying days

Graeme gave up some of his down time for a photo shoot on Wednesday

1st tee looking a little parched

Dunluce 4th green on Monday

Gary taking care of Dunluce approaches

Ben keeping a close eye on dry areas on Dunluce

Did we miss Spring?

Seems strange that recently we had frost and cold northerly winds which meant that winter playing conditions continued for a month longer than normal.

This was taken early this bank holiday Monday from the 5th green. To think I came to work with a coat on.. it was almost 20 degrees by the time I left in the morning.

New Dunluce 7th looking back towards the tee. The new fairways tend to dry down a little quicker than others, which is normal for a new hole.

Last week Trevor finished the mammoth task of over-seeding, which has been carried out using the procore to Dunluce, Valley and Skerries greens & surrounds, tees, grass paths and weak areas. Both machines have been out when weather conditions allowed since the beginning of April.

Work being carried out on the Valley 14th, Andy walking the procore to the next grass path and Gary cutting the fairway.

This is the greenside bunker on 11 which was re-built this winter and looks quite good I think now that the rough has begun to grow in on the top.

A recent visit from the BBC to view the course changes.

Sand Martins have found a home in our topsoil stockpile where overnight we had a dozen nests so the area has been protected until nesting is over. Some sand areas through the Valley also have large numbers of sand martins. Bare sand areas, although they may not look like, they are great natural habitat for these birds.